Nike

Nike’s ‘Dream Crazier’ ad is an empowering visual love letter to women

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“If we show emotion we’re called dramatic. If we want to play against men, we’re nuts. And if we dream of equal opportunity, delusional,” the voiceover in Nike’s new ad, titled “Dream Crazier,” begins.

The empowering video — which debuted during Sunday night’s Oscars and is voiced by Serena Williams — goes on to call out a slew of gender-based double standards and phrases used to put down women who strive to achieve greatness.

“When we stand for something, we’re unhinged. When we’re too good there’s something wrong with us. And if we get angry, we’re hysterical, irrational, or just being crazy,” Williams continues, while footage of some of the world’s greatest athletes — all of whom happen to be women — plays in the background. Read more…

More about Sports, Women, Culture, Nike, and Ad

Nike just bricked its self-lacing shoes by accident

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This is the future we deserve. 

Owners of the newly released $350 Nike app-connected Adapt BB self-tying shoes have taken to the Google Play store to complain that an update left their fancy kicks bricked. That’s right, the self-lacing shoes reportedly no longer connect to the accompanying app — essentially transforming them into regular old shoes (buttons on the side of the shoes means you can still tie them). And people are pissed. 

Here’s how, according to a press release, the shoes are supposed to work: An internal “advanced power-lacing system” combines with an “app and continually updated firmware” to tie and untie your footwear. The app lets you choose your perfect fit, and the shoe adjusts to your foot’s changing size as it theoretically swells throughout a basketball game. Again, that’s how it’s supposed to work.  Read more…

More about Apps, Shoes, Nike, Tech, and Consumer Tech

Now Puma has self-lacing sneakers, too

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The task we learned in kindergarten is apparently too dang hard.

Puma debuted its latest smartphone-connected self-lacing shoe called Fit Intelligence, or, “Fi,” giving Nike’s Adapt BB sneakers a run for their money. Puma released its first generation self-lacing shoes in 2016. But it says that the new Fi is powered by a “state of the art technology platform” that will allow your shoes to, uh, fit really well. 

Fi will apparently power other smart footwear products. Smart laces are — *gazes off into the cosmos* — just the beginning. Read more…

More about Wearables, Puma, Sneakers, Nike, and Back To The Future

Nike’s auto-laced future

Why does the world need a self-lacing shoe? Haven’t you heard of Velcro? How will you tie your shoes when the Wi-Fi is down? That’s the gist of the instant response I got when I mentioned the new Adapt BB, a shoe from Nike with, yes, powered laces that tighten to a wearer’s foot automatically. […]

Contentful raises $33.5M for its headless CMS platform

Contentful, a Berlin- and San Francisco-based startup that provides content management infrastructure for companies like Spotify, Nike, Lyft and others, today announced that it has raised a $33.5 million Series D funding round led by Sapphire Ventures, with participation from OMERS Ventures and Salesforce Ventures, as well as existing investors General Catalyst, Benchmark, Balderton Capital and Hercules. In […]

One billion 3D views and counting

Alice Lloyd George Contributor Alice Lloyd George is an investor at RRE Ventures and the host of Flux, a series of podcast conversations with leaders in frontier technology. More posts by this contributor Thomas Reardon and CTRL-Labs are building an API for the brain Solving the mystery of sleep Last week Sketchfab, the 3D content […]

Trump’s Nike tweet proves you should never ask a rhetorical question on Twitter

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Per usual, President Donald Trump woke up bright and early to tweet on Friday morning. This time, he went with, “What was Nike thinking?,” a clear reference to the brand’s new campaign starring former NFL star Colin Kaepernick.

Fresh on the heels of a fear-mongering campaign rally in Montana, the tweet — like most of Trump’s tweets — was clearly intended to rile up his base. Fortunately, it was also a rhetorical question, which everyone knows is a recipe for disaster if you’re trying to prove a point.

What was Nike thinking?

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) September 7, 2018 Read more…

More about Twitter, Donald Trump, Social Media, Nike, and Colin Kaepernick