Activism

16-year-old climate activist Greta Thunberg nominated for Nobel Peace Prize

Whoever thinks young people can’t change the world is wrong. For proof, just look at 16-year-old climate change activist Greta Thunberg.

Because of her efforts to combat climate change and save the planet — and inspire young people around the world to do the same — the Swedish teen has been nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize by three Norwegian lawmakers. Should she win, she would become the youngest Nobel Peace Prize recipient, as BBC News points out. Education activist Malala Yousafzai won the prize at 17 years old. 

“We have nominated Greta because the climate threat may be one of the most important causes of war and conflict,” Norwegian parliamentary representative Freddy Andre Oevstegaard told local tabloid VGRead more…

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10 children’s books to inspire young people for Women’s History Month

When it comes to female empowerment, sometimes you just need a role model to inspire your own — or your children’s — path forward.

March is Women’s History Month and National Reading Month, which means it’s the perfect time to curl up with your little one and read books about women’s achievements and contributions in music, politics, science, and more. By learning about these success, they’ll have an easier time envisioning their own. 

Yes, more work needs to be done. There’s still a gender gap in STEM, the Equal Rights Amendment has not been ratified, and Congress is overwhelmingly unbalanced (just 24 percent is women). However, there are still a lot of successes to celebrate — and read about. We’ve come a long way, and from a young age, it’s good to recognize the women who broke boundaries and made history, like NASA mathematician Katherine Johnson, who calculated how to send the first American into space, and Emily Roebling, who helped build the Brooklyn Bridge.  Read more…

More about Books, Womens History Month, Women S Rights, Social Good, and Activism

Trump fans look for safe spaces with an app avoiding ‘MAGAphobic’ restaurants

Donald Trump supporters are turning to a Yelp-like restaurant review app in search of safe spaces.

Dubbing the society-wide repulsion to the president’s signature red hats as “MAGAphobic,” Trump fans are using the app “63red Safe” as a guide to conservative-friendly restaurants. The Daily Beast reports that the app’s users rate businesses based on if the owners “make political social media posts” and if customers are allowed to carry weapons. 

63red Safe founder Scott Wallace told the Daily Beast that he’s “trying to position it as an everyday ‘where can I go to eat safely’ app” — similar to the Green Book that African American drivers used during the Jim Crow era to determine what establishments were safe, except it’s to protect people from name-calling and getting their hats taken, not keeping them safe from hate crimes.  Read more…

More about Yelp, Trump Supporters, Culture, Activism, and Web Culture

U.S. women’s soccer team marks International Women’s Day by suing for equal treatment

The U.S. women’s soccer team has a reputation for never giving up. If they happen to concede a goal or two, you can expect them to maximize every chance until they’ve closed the gap or taken the lead.

On International Women’s Day, they showed that fighting mentality off the field when the team’s 28 players sued the U.S. Soccer Federation for “years of ongoing institutionalized gender discrimination,” according to a press release. 

The suit is the latest phase in a battle for equality that launched in 2016 when the team’s highest-profile players filed a wage discrimination complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. The players, including Alex Morgan, Megan Rapinoe, and Carli Lloyd, argued that despite working as hard as — and even outperforming — the U.S. soccer men’s team, they received less compensation.  Read more…

More about Soccer, Gender Equality, Social Good, Sports, and Activism

A woman illegally climbed the Statue of Liberty. Now her judge wants to do it, too.

U.S. Magistrate Judge Gabriel Gorenstein might be a little too curious about the crime he’s overseeing. Gorenstein will preside over the case of Therese Okoumou, who climbed the Statue of Liberty on July 4, 2018 – only now Gorenstein basically wants to climb it as well.

According to NBC New York, Gorenstein wants “to better appreciate the risks or hazards created by defendant’s conduct.” He filed a court order requesting a ladder and access to the area where Okoumou was found.

Okoumou climbed the Statue on Independence Day after an Abolish ICE protest, but a U.S. Attorney deemed the climbing to be “dangerous and reckless” compared to constitutionally sanctioned peaceable protest. Read more…

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Instacart ends its shady tipping policy, thanks to internet backlash

Internet outrage might feel tiresome sometimes, but it can also be a force for good. 

The grocery and food delivery company Instacart has changed the way it pays its gig-economy workers, according to BuzzFeed. Following the outrage and worker organizing that occurred after several reports detailed the company’s payment structure — in which it used tips, not company revenue, to cover base wages — Instacart CEO Apoorva Mehta told delivery workers in an email that the company would reverse its policy.

“Based on your feedback, today we’re launching new measures to more fairly and competitively compensate all our shoppers,” Mehta wrote. “Tips should always be separate from Instacart’s contribution to shopper compensation.” Read more…

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