Google Chrome

Google Chrome to start blocking intrusive ads worldwide

Google Chrome‘s built-in ad blocker is going global this summer.

Starting on July 9, “Chrome will expand its user protections and stop showing all ads on sites in any country that repeatedly display[s] … disruptive ads,” Chrome Senior Director of Product Ben Galbraith wrote in a Wednesday blog post.

Google first launched this feature in February, but only in North America and Europe. The filter removes only the most intrusive, annoying types of ads that violate the Coalition for Better Ads’ standards, as outlined in the image below. That includes pop-up ads, full-page prestitial ads with countdown timers that block you from seeing content on the page for a certain amount of time, auto-play videos ads with sound, and large sticky ads that stay on the page even when you scroll, among others. Read more…

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Google Chrome may soon keep your back button from being hijacked

You’ve been there: Caught on a dodgy website, faced with a barrage of ads or suspicious content, and found yourself trapped — no matter how much you hit the back button.

It’s a sinister issue called “history manipulation,” where multiple dummy pages are inserted into your browser’s history to fast forward you to the page you were trying to leave.

The issue has been on the Chrome team’s radar since 2016, and now it could be a thing of the past in a future release of the browser, as spotted by 9to5Google.

In a series of published Chromium code changes, Chrome would flag pages that have been added to the back/forward history without the user’s intention, then skip them when the user hits the back button.  Read more…

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Microsoft Edge goes Chromium (and macOS)

Microsoft’s next browser might be based on Chromium

Remember the browser wars? In 1995, Microsoft launched Internet Explorer and started bundling it with Windows in order to snatch away market share from the then-dominant browser, Netscape. It worked — in the early naughts, all everyone ever used for browsing was Internet Explorer. 

But then came the alternatives: Firefox in 2004 and Google’s Chrome 2008. These browsers were faster and more advanced than Internet Explorer and they slowly chipped away at Microsoft’s browser market share, prompting Microsoft to essentially kill IE in 2015 and replace it with Edge. 

Now, however, we may be near the point in which Microsoft throws in the towel and switches to a browser based on Chromium, Google’s open-source browser project upon which Chrome (and several other browser, like Brave or Opera) is built.  Read more…

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