Google Chrome

Microsoft Edge goes Chromium (and macOS)

Microsoft’s next browser might be based on Chromium

Remember the browser wars? In 1995, Microsoft launched Internet Explorer and started bundling it with Windows in order to snatch away market share from the then-dominant browser, Netscape. It worked — in the early naughts, all everyone ever used for browsing was Internet Explorer. 

But then came the alternatives: Firefox in 2004 and Google’s Chrome 2008. These browsers were faster and more advanced than Internet Explorer and they slowly chipped away at Microsoft’s browser market share, prompting Microsoft to essentially kill IE in 2015 and replace it with Edge. 

Now, however, we may be near the point in which Microsoft throws in the towel and switches to a browser based on Chromium, Google’s open-source browser project upon which Chrome (and several other browser, like Brave or Opera) is built.  Read more…

More about Microsoft, Google Chrome, Web Browser, Browser, and Chromium

Google tweaks Android licensing terms in Europe to allow Google app unbundling — for a fee

Why experts are freaking out over the new way Google Chrome sign-in works

The internet has erupted over Google’s latest Chrome release — and not in a good way.

With an updated user interface, enhanced password manager, and a slew of other updates, you would assume the latest version of Google’s popular web browser, Chrome 69, would be eliciting some pretty good responses.

But security experts just shined a light on a controversial feature that came with the latest Google Chrome that previously wasn’t announced by the search giant.

A Google Chrome user recently pointed out on Hacker News that Google now forces you to login to your Google account on Chrome if you login to any other Google service using the browser. Logging out of a Google service will also force log you out of Google Chrome. Read more…

More about Google, Privacy, Security, Google Chrome, and Web Browser