Twitter’s new dark mode is actually black and it’s glorious

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One of the best design trends of the last year or so is the rise of dark themes for popular apps. If you spend a lot of time staring at screens, dark modes are both easier on the eyes and your battery life. 

Now, Twitter is making its dark mode even better, with a new darker theme that’s actually black (as opposed to the previous navy blue-tinged color scheme) and the ability to enable dark mode automatically. 

With the changes (which are out on iOS now), Twitter is adding a blacker variation of dark mod  called “Lights Out.” Unlike the app’s previous dark theme, Lights Out is actually black – “a pure black color palette that emits no light since the pixels are turned off,” according to Twitter. Here’s what it looks like compared to the old night mode (which is still available and now labeled as “Dim” in the app.)  Read more…

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Twitter warns users about falling for birthday changing prank

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A prank is making the rounds on Twitter, and it’s seemingly locking people out of their accounts.

The trick gets people to change their birthday on the social media platform to 2007, which would purportedly unlock new colour schemes.

Some of the prank posts have thousands of retweets.

damn changing your birth year to 2007 makes your twitter feed all colourful we been missin out

— 44 (@s_rxii) March 25, 2019

Since its cb season I’m going to be nice to antis. to prove my good intentions I’m going to tell you a secret, if you change your twitter age to 2007 you can get a rainbow mode. Fellow armys please be nice & don’t do it or the glitch will be gone, be considerated.

— 𝔇𝔯𝔢𝔞♚⚕ (@buteracypher) March 25, 2019 Read more…

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Hashtag about a world without Twitter is trending… on Twitter

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If we’re being honest, tweeting about what the world would be like without Twitter is peak 2019. And, yet, here we are, with #InAWorldWithoutTwitter trending on an early Spring Saturday.

The tweets are a mix of genuine and jokes yet most of them all hold a grain of truth in them and reveal the best and worst of Twitter as a platform.

#InAWorldWithNoTwitter we’d have no covfefe
No hamberders
No smocking guns
No unpresidented
No Scott Free
No wire tapp
No Melanie
No Councel

But we’d still have Tim Applepic.twitter.com/aDz8B4k5Qz

— BrooklynDad_Defiant! (@mmpadellan) March 23, 2019

People would use there, there or they’re incorrectly their entire lives#InAWorldWithNoTwitter

— Jesse Lifson (@DoYouEvenLIf) March 23, 2019 Read more…

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Instagram tests letting you rethink your terrible new username

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Instagram is about to give its users some time to think over that name change.

An automatic username lock feature has been discovered in the latest alpha version of Instagram’s Android application. The change, which is currently in testing, would give the previous owner of an Instagram handle up to 14 days to revert back to their old username after changing it.

Instagram will start locking old usernames for 14 days after changing so the previous owner can revert to it within the grace period

This is the end of username grabber bots ­čśÇ pic.twitter.com/mAAgbDYny2

— Jane Manchun Wong (@wongmjane) March 20, 2019 Read more…

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Facebook has removed 1.5 million videos of the New Zealand shooting, but questions remain

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We already knew that Facebook moved quickly on Thursday to stop videos of the New Zealand mass shooting from spreading, but now we have some actual numbers.

In a public statement and identical series of tweets dispensed by Facebook Newsroom, the company confirms that 1.5 million videos were removed in the first 24 hours following the terror attack on two New Zealand mosques that left 50 dead and 50 injured as of Sunday. Of those, 1.2 million were stopped before they were even uploaded.

The news and accompanying statement comes from Facebook exec Mia Garlick:

In the first 24 hours we removed 1.5 million videos of the attack globally, of which over 1.2 million were blocked at upload…

— Facebook Newsroom (@fbnewsroom) March 17, 2019 Read more…

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Facebook’s News Feed changes were supposed to make us feel good. It’s not working.

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More than a year after Facebook changed its News Feed algorithm to make us feel better, new data suggests we’re still sharing the same old garbage as before. 

NewsWhip, an analytics company that tracks how content spreads across Facebook, put out a new report looking at how last year’s News Feed changes have affected what’s being shared on Facebook. Unsurprisingly, its findings aren’t very encouraging.

For context: Mark Zuckerberg announced sweeping changes to News Feed last January, promising that “we feel a responsibility to make sure our services aren’t just fun to use, but also good for people’s well-being.” As a result, he said, the company would be making adjustments to News Feed in order to optimize for “helping you have more meaningful social interactions,” rather than pure engagement.  Read more…

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Slack removes more than two dozen accounts tied to hate groups

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Slack is giving the boot to users with ties to hate groups.

On Thursday, the messaging company announced that it had removed more than two dozen users that were affiliated with hate groups. In all, Slack banned 28 accounts.

“The use of Slack by hate groups runs counter to everything we believe in at Slack and is not welcome on our platform,” the company said in a statement.

Last week, the online media collective Unicorn Riot published leaked Slack messages that revealed white nationalist group Identity Evropa was using the platform to organize events. Slack is traditionally used by businesses as an internal messenger and file-sharing tool. However, as leaked messages show, members of Identity Evropa preferred to use Slack over alternative sources, like Discord, for its localized event planning. There was also a growing distrust of Discord as a safe space for their private communications. Read more…

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Facebook loses two important executives amid new privacy push

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Two of Facebook’s most important executives are leaving the company amid its decision to refocus its platform around encryption and privacy.

Chris Cox, Facebook’s Chief Product Officer, and Chris Daniels, who has lead WhatsApp since the departure of founder Jan Koum, are both leaving the company. Both men are long-serving Facebook veterans — Cox was one of Facebook’s earliest employees, and Daniels has been with the company since 2011 — and trusted lieutenants of Mark Zuckerberg. 

Their departures come barely a week after Zuckerberg announced sweeping changes to Facebook, in order re-orient the social network around encryption and privacy. A big piece of that plan hinges on combining the messaging infrastructure of WhatsApp, Instagram, and facebook Messenger. In a memo to employees, Zuckerberg suggested the events were linked. Read more…

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